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Preservation News

Going, Going, Gone

 

Despite the best efforts of preservationists, significant buildings still are destroyed!

 

The images below track some of the recent losses-showing the building before, during demolition, and the current use of the site. In many cases, unfortunately, all that remains is a vacant lot. To witness this transformation, simply click on an image and you will see a three-part "slide show:" going, going, gone .

 

 

 
   
 

Bache Memorial Chapel

Built 1972

 

 

Baum and Temple Buildings

Built 1908

 

 

 

 

 

 

In April, 2005 the Bache Memorial Chapel in Cartwright Cemetery in rural Tuscola was demolished. The reinforced concrete chapel was a rare and significant example of Brutalism-style architecture in rural Illinois.   FULL STORY

 

 

Demolished by the City of Danville in  2001, just months after having been named to LPCI’s Ten Most Endangered list. At the time of demolition, each building had been vacant and neglected for at least half a decade.   FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen J.
Beggs House

Built 1910

 

 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad Station

Built 1916

 

 

 

 

 

May 2002, this Elmhurst house, was demolished after a developer purchased the lot it sat on for $460,000.  The residence, built in 1910 for an officer with a patent medicine company, was designed  by architect Walter B. Griffin.  FULL STORY

 

 

The National Register listed Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis Railroad Station (the “Big Four”) in Mattoon was demolished in April of 2004 by its owners. The Beaux-Arts style structure  served as a railroad depot.  FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

Congregational
Church

Built 1892

 

 

DuPage Theatre

Built 1928

 

 

 

 

 

 

This long-vacant structure, whose four-story bell tower has been a Pittsfield downtown landmark for 112 years, was ordered torn down in Sept. 2003 by the City Council due to safety concerns. Numerous attempts to stabilize the 1881 building failed.  FULL STORY

 

 

After a decade of community protests, alternative plans, and a lawsuit, the village board voted in March 2007 to completely demolish this 1928 structure — despite what advocates had perceived to be a final compromise for its redevelopment.
 
FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

Emmanuel
Presbyterian Church

Built 1965

 

 

Fischer-Crane Mansion

Built 1892

 

 

 

 

 

 

On August 3, 2007, the Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, was demolished by its owner, the Heneghan Wrecking Co. The brick church had been designed by Edward Dart, an award-winning architect best known for St. Procopius Abbey in Lisle, Illinois.   FULL STORY

 

 

With the demolition of the red brick

Queen Anne-style Fischer-Crane mansion in February 2003, Elmhurst has lost another historic building. The impressive and still structurally sound building was torn down — despite preservation efforts.  FULL STORY

       
 

Hayes-Healy Gymnasium

Built 1929

 

 

Hotel LaSalle Garage

Built 1918

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Chicago Transit Authority demolished this Collegiate Gothic-style building in December 2005. The structure, which had been built in 1929 as a gym for the McCormick Theological Seminary, is owned by DePaul University … FULL STORY

 

 

The Commission on Chicago Landmarks voted in November 2004 not to recommend landmark designation of this 87-year-old parking garage, which was one of the oldest buildings of its kind in the U.S. The city’s planning department had opposed the designation … FULL STORY

 

       
 

Hubbard-Brach
House

Built 1854

 

 

Nathan W. Huntley House

Built 1859

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In February 2001, this Winnetka house

was torn down. Built in 1854, the

Italianate-style residence was the home

of early settler Gilbert Hubbard  and

remodeled in 1924 for Edwin Brach, a

partner in the famed Chicago candy

company.  FULL STORY

 

 

One of Chicago’s oldest buildings—which

pre-dated both the Civil War and the Fire of 1871—was torn down on September 30, 2002. This 1859 two-story Italianate was  demolished in order to construct a condominium building.  FULL STORY

       
 

W. H. Knight
House

Built 1894

 

Marsh House

Built 1910

 

 

 

 

  Hinsdale has lost 25% of its housing stock to the teardown phenomenon in the past ten years. This Queen Anne-style building was torn down in late summer 2002 by its new owner, for a new super-sized residence on the prominent corner site.  FULL STORY   This Prairie Style residence design by Walter Burley Griffin and built for securities broker James S. Marsh, sat on a wooded lot opposite Winnetka’s New Trier High School. The new owner-developer demolished this historic building.  FULL STORY

 

       
 

Middaugh Mansion

Built 1892

 

 

North Shore Spanish Baptist Church

Built 1884

 

 

 

 

 

The only Clarendon Hills building  listed

on the National Register of Historic

Places was demolished June 2002 after

village officials refused to assist in the

building's relocation. The mansion was

built by Henry C. Middaugh.  FULL STORY 

 

 

Teardowns continue to plague this North Side neighborhood, as one of its oldest structures, the 120-year-old North Shore Spanish Baptist Church, at Montrose and Hermitage, was demolished in late November 2004.  FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

Plymouth Hotel

Built 1912

 

 

Quincy Schoolhouse

Built 1898; 1914 addition
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the oldest buildings in Chicago's

Uptown Square National Register

District was demolished March 2003 as

part of a development project. Built in

1912, it became the choice lodging for

silent film stars at nearby Essanay

Studios.  FULL STORY

 

 

This three-story former schoolhouse, set upon a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River, was located on a large corner lot across from the Quincy Civic Center. The building was originally constructed in 1898 with a 1914 addition totaling 24,000 sq. ft. Several interior.   FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

The Rainbo Gardens Building

Built 1928

 

Randhurst Mall

Built 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

Host to a variety of amusements and  early twentieth century's celebrities, Rainbo Gardens has long been one of Chicago's premier recreation and entertainment venues. As early as 1894, the site was occupied by a small roadside restaurant.   FULL STORY

 

In August, 2009, this iconic regional shopping center at the intersection of Rand and Elmhurst roads was demolished to make way for a new mixed-use “lifestyle center.” Designed by Victor Gruen, the father of the American shopping mall, it was the first enclosed  …  FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

Built 1912

 

 

St. Leo Catholic
Church

Built 1905

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Archdiocese of Chicago began demolition of this 94-year-old structure in March 2006, amid protests from the Chicago Heights Historic Preservation Advisory Committee. A city demolition permit had been issued without committee review …  FULL STORY

 

This 1905 Romanesque Revival church features a majestic bell tower and other Prairie Style-influenced details. Its architect was William J. Brinkman, whose church designs include  St. Michael’s in the Chicago Old Town Triangle District.  
FULL STORY

 

 

 

 

 

Simmons-Cooke House

Built 1854

 

Lorado Taft’s Midway Studios Addition
Built 1972

 

 

 

 

 

The fight to save this 19th c Greek Revival structure in Downtown Waukegan has been lost. In March 2005, the Waukegan Historic Preservation Commission asked the County for an additional six months to relocate the building.   FULL STORY

 

 

In early November 2009, the Edward Dart-designed addition to Lorado Taft’s Midway Studio at the University of Chicago (U of C) was demolished to make way for a courtyard for the university’s proposed Reva and David Logan Center.   FULL STORY 
       
 

Universalist
Unitarian Church

Built 1911

 
 

Walker School

Built 1925

 

 

 

 

  This 1911 Neo Classical-style church was sold in 2004 by the congregation to a local medical center. The congregation relocated to a new facility. The Joliet church was not protected as a local landmark, and the new owner planned to demolish the structure.   FULL STORY    A 2004 local school bond referendum included $8.2 million to replace historic Walker School. Local preservationists had campaigned to remodel the school rather than demolish it for a new two-story structure.   FULL STORY 
       

 

 

 

 

  "Going" Illustration by John Michael Downs
       
       
       

 

 

 

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Chicago, IL 60604 
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